Lumens and Lighting Facts

When most people think about lighting, they have a surface level knowledge of the subject. However, knowing more about lighting can make you a better consumer and save you money in the long run! For example, did you know lumens are more important when shopping for light bulbs than wattage? When shopping for light bulbs, how much of the lighting facts do you understand? Find out everything you need to keno to make a smart decision for your home or business!

Much like food has a nutrition guide, your lighting has a guide on the product called the Lighting Facts. These facts help you understand the abilities of the light bulbs you are purchasing.

Information on the Lighting Facts

  • Brightness
  • Estimated yearly energy costs
  • Life
  • Light appearance
  • Energy used

While all of these factors play a role in the abilities of the light bulbs, the brightness factor is by far the most important factor. When we say brightness, it is referring to lumens. What do we mean by lumens? Here are some facts to know.

  • Lumens refer to how much light the bulb puts out.
  • Since a lumen is a unit of measurement, it makes sense that the higher the lumens, the brighter the bulb.
  • When considering lumens, you should consider the amount of light needed for your space. It depends on the space you need to light. Brighter is not always better and can create a blinding effect in a space too small for the lumens.
  • A light bulb for a workstation is recommended to be around 50 lumens per square feet while a living room setting of approximately 250 feet will need around 5000 lumens. It is important to note that this doesn’t mean you need only one light source to meet this lumen output. You could have a primary light source with 3000 lumens and a secondary with 2000 lumens lighting the room for a total lumen count of 5000.

When it comes to light bulbs, shop for lumen and not wattage. While the old way of shopping was based on wattage as the deciding factor, it is smarter to shop for lumens because you are buying the amount of brightness you need for your space. Here are a few general rules for this aspect of choosing lighting provided by the US Department of Energy.

  • To replace a 100 watt (W) incandescent bulb, look for a bulb that gives you about 1600 lumens. If you want something dimmer, go for fewer lumens; if you prefer brighter light, look for more lumens.
  • Replace a 75W bulb with an energy-saving bulb that gives you about 1100 lumens
  • Replace a 60W bulb with an energy-saving bulb that gives you about 800 lumens
  • Replace a 40W bulb with an energy-saving bulb that gives you about 450 lumens

When it comes to light bulbs, shop for lumen and not wattage. While the old way of shopping was based on wattage as the deciding factor, it is smarter to shop for lumens because you are buying the amount of brightness you need for your space. Aside from brightness or lumen output, the other factors play their part in achieving a great lighting solution.

  • The estimated yearly cost will help you determine the effects of your utility bill based on a set of varying factors and suggested daily usage.
  • The lifespan will take the calculated usage suggested and multiply it to tell consumers how many years the light bulb can be expected to last.
  • Light appearance is the color temperature in terms of warm or cool.
  • Finally, the energy used is how much energy is used to create the lighting. This is measured in watts.

With a basic understanding of the importance of lumens and how to choose the right bulb for your space, you can make a confident, informed decision. The Lighting Facts should be a handy guide as to the capabilities of a bulb, but lumens is where you should focus when shopping.

Sources

  • https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/lumens-and-lighting-facts-label