Office Lighting Infographic

Productivity

Lighting plays a role in employee productivity. With the right office lighting, ensure a productive workforce to achieve company goals. Here are a few tips for lighting for productivity.

Layer lighting. The days of using only one type of fixture are gone. Today’s workers respond better to a layered light source. Overhead fixtures are a mainstay in any office but make sure you balance the light directions with layered lighting. Add in wall sconces and reduce the lumen output from the overhead to ensure a better balance.

While natural light can and should be used when possible, artificial lighting should mimic natural daylight to achieve the same productivity effects of natural sunlight. It is a known fact that the presence of daylight or daylight mimicking light fixtures improve focus and productivity. To achieve this, the key is the color temperature. Choose a color temperature closer to the natural temperature of sunlight (around 4700K-5000K) to get the best results.

Don’t ignore task lighting. While overhead and wall sconces create a layered effect, task lighting is still crucial. Task lighting should be more concentrated in lumen output with a smaller scope such as desk lamps.

Consider LED. When looking for a more even and consistent color temperature and illumination output, LED has quickly outplaced fluorescent as the frontrunner. It offers a color temperature closer to natural light without any yellow tinge like fluorescent or incandescent.

People

While productivity is key, you should never forget you are lighting for actual people. Here are a few keys to achieve people pleasing office lighting.

Watch for glares. When light reflects a metal or glass surface, it naturally causes a glare which can be uncomfortable for the eyes. Avoid this by adding diffusers to the more powerful lighting fixtures (usually the overhead fixtures) and make sure you consider directional lights (such as track lighting or sconces) so the light beam hits just below the ceiling or the top of the wall.

Light for screen use. The use of technology devices changes the lighting needs. In addition to the above-mentioned glare control, you should also consider the color temperature of the light sources in relation to screens such as computers, projectors, or other tools your company uses. Make sure the color temperature of the lights in areas where workers will spend the majority of their time on screen work are similar in color. Opt for around 4800K-5000K to reduce eye strain when working on the computer. Working on a screen in a cooler temperature with warmer lighting surrounding the screen can be jarring for the eyes.

Give some individual control. While the main fixtures will be unchangeable, more companies are giving workers more individual control over the lighting at their workspace. From installing dimmer capabilities in individual offices to providing multiple options for task lighting, give your staff more control to allow for a more custom fit to their needs.