Requirements for Explosion Proof Lighting

When it comes to lighting, there are a few things worth knowing to ensure you get the right option for your location. For instance, explosion proof lighting is a solution commonly used in areas where hazardous gases or high heat temperatures are present regularly. While this is the only suitable lighting solution for certain types of locations, there is still some confusion regarding requirements for explosion proof lighting. Let’s take a closer look at the matter to clear up any misunderstanding regarding this type of fixture.

What is explosion proof lighting?

Before we look at the requirements for explosion proof lighting, we should cover what it is and isn’t in more detail. Many people think explosion proof lighting is lighting capable of surviving an actual explosion since it is used in areas where hazardous materials are present, but it has nothing to do with that aspect. Explosion proof lighting is a type of fixture which can be exposed to certain elements, such as chemicals, gases, or high heat, that is designed to be protected against the fixture itself exploding from being exposed to these harsher conditions and environment. This feature is important because if the fixture explodes it won’t send glass flying everywhere.

What are the different classes?

Different areas may have different requirements for explosion proof lighting. There are several classes the fixture type can be classified as and finding the right one for your application will depend on these classes.

These are the requirement for explosion proof lighting:

Class I, Division 1 – An area where flammable concentrations of gases, vapors or liquids are present continuously or regularly within the atmosphere under normal operating conditions.

Class I, Division 2 – An area where flammable concentrations of gases, vapors, or liquids exist within the atmosphere under abnormal operating conditions.

Class II, Division 1 – An area where flammable concentrations of combustible dust exist within the atmosphere under normal operating conditions.

Class II, Division 2 – An area where flammable concentrations of combustible dust exist within the atmosphere under abnormal operating conditions.

Class III, Division 1 – An area where easily flammable fibers or materials producing combustible residue or shavings exists within the atmosphere under normal operating conditions.

Class III, Division 2 – An area where easily flammable fibers or materials producing combustible residue or shavings exist within the atmosphere under abnormal operating conditions.